Eat and drink, but waste not by excess || #EidMubarak to all celebrating! Let’s do something to take care of the Earth! Grow trees 🌳 , Aware 💡 people to #BeatAirPollution on this #WorldEnvironmentDay Thanks to @UNEnvironment

#EidMubarak

It’s a time to celebrate #EidAlFitr as well as #WorldEnvironmentDay with loved ones, both celebrations are coinsiding on 5 June.

It’s an opportunity to recommit to values of gratitude and solidarity. At a time of complex challenges, e.g. conflicts, inequality, poverty and climate change. This year, we should buy only what we need to minimize air pollution and climate change. After all, the Quran tells us not only that we are the stewards of this Earth, but that we should not waste.

“Eat and drink: but waste not by excess, for Allah loveth not the wasters.” وَكُلُوا وَاشْرَبُوا وَلَا تُسْرِفُوا ۚ إِنَّهُ لَا يُحِبُّ الْمُسْرِفِين

This World Environment Day, let us all be faithful to the teachings of the Quran and do what we can to fight air pollution.

The people’s day

Above all, World Environment Day is the “people’s day” for doing something to take care of the Earth. That “something” can be local, national or global. It can be a solo action or involve a crowd. Everyone is free to choose.

👉 Grow trees 🌳

👉Aware 💡people about source of Air pollution.
👉Use public transport or car sharing, cycle or walk. 👉Switch to a hybrid or electric vehicle and request electric taxis.

👉Turn off the car engine when stationary.

👉Reduce your consumption of meat and dairy to help cut methane emissions. 👉Compost organic food items and recycle non-organic trash.

👉Switch to high-efficiency home heating systems and equipment.

👉Save energy: turn off lights and electronics when not in use .

👉Choose non-toxic paints and furnishings.

👉Use #EidMubarak #EidAlFitr #BeatAirPollution #WorldEnvironmentDay in your social media posts and don’t forget to tag @UNEnvironment and @saverango

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We need to save our wild places. We can’t survive without them || World Economic Forum Thanks to @UN @antonioguterres @UNECOSOC @UNEnvironment

The oxygen we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat – they all depend on other forms of life.

Without the rest of species on the planet, there would be no prosperity, no economy, no us. Not only have we taken all those species and the goods and services we obtain from them for granted, but we have also destroyed their homes and families – at grave cost to them, and us.

As scientists like E.O. Wilson have been telling us for a generation, we need half of the planet in a natural state, with functioning ecosystems that continue providing for us. For instance, we cannot achieve the Paris climate agreement goal (not to exceed 2°C in atmospheric temperature above pre-industrial levels) without intact ecosystems – our forests, grasslands, ocean habitats – absorbing much of the excess carbon pollution we expel into the atmosphere. More protected areas with thriving biodiversity not only go hand-in-hand with climate change mitigation but also they are required to correct our devastating trajectories. Nature is our greatest friend and ally, not our foe.

A question we often encounter, however, is how can we protect more forests and oceans with the growing human population? We’ll need to feed 10 billion people! But studies show that our current agricultural footprint already can feed 10 billion people. We’re just wasting a third of it along the supply chain, from the field to the table. We can feed the human population with dietary changes (eat less red meat and more plants); fishing and farming subsidies reform; and smarter, less wasteful, regenerative agriculture that helps build soil instead of throwing it away every time it rains.

Read more click here!

A multifaith movement will push to address climate change || @UN #SDGs #GlobalGoals

The Rev. Grace Ji-Sun Kim:


Climate change is happening right before our eyes. While we live in partial ignorance of the constant changes in the world around us, it is impossible to ignore the devastation that has emerged from the rising global climate. Scientists have been warning us for years that we must change our ways. Theynow warn us that we have only 12 years for global warming to be kept to 1.5 degrees Celsius or the risk of drought, floods and storms will worsen for millions.

My 2019 prediction is that churches and people of faith across the world will recognize the destruction of climate change and make a prophetic call to change our ways of living. This new year, the climate change problems that we have faced in 2018 will certainly worsen if we do not make conscious efforts to change our behavior and take action. Churches and religious organizations will recognize the urgency involved in changing our ways to fight climate change.

Religious groups like the World Council of Churches (WCC) and ACT Alliance are already engaged in advocacy work to fight for climate justice and sustainability. WCC works toward justice, peace and love and continues to respond to the impacts of climate change. Such groups need to work together with faith traditions around the world for interfaith advocacy and work.

Climate change is an issue of both ecological and economic justice. It disproportionally affects the world’s poorest people and displaces the most vulnerable communities. Thus religious people all over the world must unify their collective influence to fight this battle and work together to advocate for policies at local and national levels for sustainable practices.

As people of faith, we cannot continue to ignore climate change while God’s creation is suffering. We must act and invest in fighting climate change as it may be the only investment that will have direct results for a brighter and safer future. We need to invest in clean, renewable energy; reduce the global carbon footprint; reduce waste; and recycle and reuse more actively. As people of faith, we need to take seriously our theological engagement, advocacy and social action to advert a climate catastrophe.

Kim is an associate professor of theology at Earlham School of Religion and co-author of “Intersectional Theology” and “Healing Our Broken Humanity.”