We wish you and your family a joyful, serene and white Christmas || Have a jolly and blessed Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Merry Christmas Wishes

  • May the melody and spirit of the holidays fill your home with love and peace. We wish you all the best and happy New Year too!
  • In this loveliest and happiest of seasons, may you find many reasons to celebrate. Have a wonderful Christmas!
  • May your Christmas be decorated with cheer and filled with love. Have a wonderful holiday!
  • Let the spirit of Christmas warm your home with love, joy and peace. Have a blessed Christmas!
  • Count your blessings, sing your Christmas carols, open your gifts, and make a wish under the Christmas tree. May you have a Merry Christmas!
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India has the largest number of malnourished children in the world ||40% of the Indian children are undernourished ||

Malnutrition refers to deficiencies, excesses or imbalances in a person’s intake of energy and/or nutrients.

The term malnutrition covers 2 broad groups of conditions. One is ‘undernutrition’—which includes stunting (low height for age), wasting (low weight for height), underweight (low weight for age) and micronutrient deficiencies or insufficiencies (a lack of important vitamins and minerals). The other is overweight, obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases (such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer).

Consequences of Malnutrition:

Malnutrition affects people in every country. Around 1.9 billion adults worldwide are overweight, while 462 million are underweight. An estimated 41 million children under the age of 5 years are overweight or obese, while some 159 million are stunted and 50 million are wasted.

Many families cannot afford or access enough nutritious foods like fresh fruit and vegetables, legumes, meat and milk, while foods and drinks high in fat, sugar and salt are cheaper and more readily available, leading to a rapid rise in the number of children and adults who are overweight and obese, in poor as well as rich countries.

Malnutrition in India:

“More than one third of the world’s malnourished children live in India. Among these, half of the children under three years old are underweight and a third of wealthiest children are over-nutriented.” said the joint study by Assocham and EY. The report found that towards the end of 2015, 40% (i.e. 50.8 million) of the Indian children were undernourished.

About 37% of under-five children are underweight, 39% are stunted, 21% are wasted and 8% are severely acutely malnourished.
Only about 10 per cent children under the age 6-23 months are receiving an adequate diet.

In the age bracket of 1-5 years, the prevalence of underweight children ranged from 42% in Jharkhand, followed by Bihar, MP and UP with 37%, 36% and 34.1% respectively, to 14.1% in Manipur. The prevalence of stunting ranged from 50.4% in UP to 19.4% in Kerala according to the report.

India is ranked as the third most obese nation of the world after US and China and is called the diabetes capital of the world, with about 69.2 million people living with it as per the 2015 data by WHO.

One of the major causes for malnutrition in India is economic inequality. Due to the low social status of some population groups, their diet often lacks in both quality and quantity.

It is important to understand that malnutrition derives not just from a lack of food but from a diverse set of interlinked processes linking health, care, education, sanitation and hygiene, access to resources, women’s empowerment and more.

Nutrition is a core pillar of human development and concrete, large-scale programming not only can reduce the burden of undernutrition and deprivation in countries but also can advance the progress of nations.

The World Today and in 2030 || Celebrating the 30th anniversary of #WorldAIDSDay – a pioneering global health campaign first initiated by @WHO in 1988. Thanks to @UN @antonioguterres @UNECOSOC #GlobalGoals #HealthForAll

Urge policy-makers to promote a “health for all” agenda for HIV and related health services, such as tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis and noncommunicable diseases.

Event : World AIDS Day

When : 01 December 2018

Theme : Know Your Status

The world pledged to end AIDS by 2030. While we have seen remarkable progress in the past decade among children aged 0-9 years, adolescents have been left behind in HIV prevention efforts. A staggering 360,000 adolescents are projected to die of AIDS-related diseases between 2018 and 2030 without additional investment in HIV prevention, testing and treatment programs.

On World AIDS Day 2018, UNICEF is releasing global and regional snapshots of the world today and a new analysis of the situation for children and adolescents projected to 2030.

The world today: Global and regional snapshots

Click to access snapshots: Global, Eastern and Southern Africa, West and Central Africa, South Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, East Asia and the Pacific, Middle East and North Africa, Eastern Europe and Central Asia

  • 3.0 million children and adolescents are living with HIV
  • 430,000 children and adolescents became newly infected with the virus in 2017
  • 130,000 children and adolescents died from AIDS-related causes in 2017

The world in 2030

  • 1.9 million children and adolescents are projected to be living with HIV
  • 270,000 children and adolescents are projected to become newly infected with the virus annually
  • 56,000 children and adolescents are projected to die from AIDS-related causes annually
  • 2.0 million new HIV infections could be averted between 2018 and 2030 if global goals are met – 1.5 million of these would be averted among adolescents.

Over 3,400 people die on the 🌎’s roads every day and tens of millions are injured or disabled every year. 👧🏽 Children, 🚶‍🚶🏻‍♀️pedestrians, 🚴‍♀️cyclists 👵and older people are among the most vulnerable of road users. #WDoR2018 @WHO @UNGeneva

Global status report on road safety 2015

The Global status report on road safety 2015, reflecting information from 180 countries, indicates that worldwide the total number of road traffic deaths has plateaued at 1.25 million per year, with the highest road traffic fatality rates in low-income countries. In the last three years, 17 countries have aligned at least one of their laws with best practice on seat-belts, drink–driving, speed, motorcycle helmets or child restraints. While there has been progress towards improving road safety legislation and in making vehicles safer, the report shows that the pace of change is too slow. Urgent action is needed to achieve the ambitious target for road safety reflected in the newly adopted 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: halving the global number of deaths and injuries from road traffic crashes by 2020. Made possible through funding from Bloomberg Philanthropies, this report is the third in the series, and provides a snapshot of the road safety situation globally, highlighting the gaps and the measures needed to best drive progress.

May this Diwali illuminate your new dreams, new expectations, new roads, and new points of view? May it shower everything great in your life and fill every day with wonderful minutes. #HappyDeepavali

Ten Points about Diwali||

1. The Hindus In India Celebrated Many Festival.

2. Diwali Is The Very Famous Festival In India.

3. On Diwali, The Lord RAMA Came Back After 14 Years to Ayodhya.

4. Each and Every person of Ayodhya Celebrated Lord RAMA arrival.

5. The People of Ayodhya Celebrated his arrival by Lighting up there houses with Candles.

6. The whole Ayodhya celebrated this festival with there friends and Family.

7. Individuals Serve Sweets To Their Friends and Relatives.

8. All People Wear New Dresses On This Festival.

9. Individuals Decorate Their Homes With Lamps and Candles.

10. Diwali Is Also Called “Festival Of Lights”.

#HappyDeepavali

International Week of Science and Peace kicks off on 6 Nov! 📚💉 We need more #womeninscience👩‍ 🐠like @JaneGoodallInst who can broaden our understanding of our planet to make our societies more peaceful and sustainable. Thanx to @UN @UN_Woman @ECOSOC

Technology in Today’s World and in the Future ||

Technology is an essential part of our lives today and few can imagine living without. We achieved a lot with the help of technology, for example we have the possibility to travel, keep in touch with friends on the other side of the earth and cure many illnesses. It means more freedom and choices for people but at the same time we have to consider the social imbalance, weapons of mass destruction and natural resource depletion.

Jane Godall asks for a reason: “We are the most intelligent species walking on earth, how it comes we destroy on what we depend?”

What has achieved so far is irrevocable, but we can still determine where it goes in the future.

Technology in our today’s life.

When it comes to the way we communicate, modern technology has had an impressive influence on communication in the 21stcentury and daily life in general. Very few students and teachers would disagree with this notion.

The advancement in technology has made it possible for teachers to impart knowledge to students from any location. In the past, there had to be a physical contact for any class to hold.

Now, there is no specific need for that as both the tutor and the learner can communicate via different media and platforms such as Skype. Digital technology has also changed what people term as ‘media.’ A media company isn’t necessarily a news platform anymore.

70th Anniversary of Universal Declaration of Human Rights |💁10 Dec 2018| Dignity of millions has been uplifted, untold humansuffering prevented and foundations 4 a most just world have been laid. #StandUp4HumanRights Thanx @UN @antonioguterres @UNGeneva @UNECOSOC

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights empowers us all.

#StandUp4HumanRights

The power of the Universal Declaration is the power of ideas to change the world. It inspires us to continue working to ensure all people can gain freedom, equality and dignity.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 1

Free and equal

All human beings are born free and equal and should be treated the same way.

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 2

Freedom from discrimination

Everyone can claim their rights regardless of sex, race, language, religion, social standing, etc.

Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

Article 3

Right to life

Everyone has the right to life and to live in freedom and safety.

Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

Article 4

Freedom from slavery

No one has the right to treat you as a slave nor should you enslave anyone.

No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.

Article 5

Freedom from torture

No one has the right to torture you.

No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

Article 6

Right to recognition before the law

You should be legally protected in the same way everywhere like anyone else.

Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

Article 7

Right to equality before the law

The law is the same for everyone and should be applied in the same manner to all.

All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.

Article 8

Access to justice

You have the right to obtain legal help and access the justice system when your rights are not respected.

Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

Article 9

Freedom from arbitrary detention

No one can arrest or detain you arbitrarily , or send you away from your country unjustly.

No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

Article 10

Right to a fair trial

Trials should be public and tried in a fair manner by an impartial and independent tribunal.

Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.

To read Article 11 to 30 please click here

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