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India has the largest number of malnourished children in the world ||40% of the Indian children are undernourished ||

Malnutrition refers to deficiencies, excesses or imbalances in a person’s intake of energy and/or nutrients.

The term malnutrition covers 2 broad groups of conditions. One is ‘undernutrition’—which includes stunting (low height for age), wasting (low weight for height), underweight (low weight for age) and micronutrient deficiencies or insufficiencies (a lack of important vitamins and minerals). The other is overweight, obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases (such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer).

Consequences of Malnutrition:

Malnutrition affects people in every country. Around 1.9 billion adults worldwide are overweight, while 462 million are underweight. An estimated 41 million children under the age of 5 years are overweight or obese, while some 159 million are stunted and 50 million are wasted.

Many families cannot afford or access enough nutritious foods like fresh fruit and vegetables, legumes, meat and milk, while foods and drinks high in fat, sugar and salt are cheaper and more readily available, leading to a rapid rise in the number of children and adults who are overweight and obese, in poor as well as rich countries.

Malnutrition in India:

“More than one third of the world’s malnourished children live in India. Among these, half of the children under three years old are underweight and a third of wealthiest children are over-nutriented.” said the joint study by Assocham and EY. The report found that towards the end of 2015, 40% (i.e. 50.8 million) of the Indian children were undernourished.

About 37% of under-five children are underweight, 39% are stunted, 21% are wasted and 8% are severely acutely malnourished.
Only about 10 per cent children under the age 6-23 months are receiving an adequate diet.

In the age bracket of 1-5 years, the prevalence of underweight children ranged from 42% in Jharkhand, followed by Bihar, MP and UP with 37%, 36% and 34.1% respectively, to 14.1% in Manipur. The prevalence of stunting ranged from 50.4% in UP to 19.4% in Kerala according to the report.

India is ranked as the third most obese nation of the world after US and China and is called the diabetes capital of the world, with about 69.2 million people living with it as per the 2015 data by WHO.

One of the major causes for malnutrition in India is economic inequality. Due to the low social status of some population groups, their diet often lacks in both quality and quantity.

It is important to understand that malnutrition derives not just from a lack of food but from a diverse set of interlinked processes linking health, care, education, sanitation and hygiene, access to resources, women’s empowerment and more.

Nutrition is a core pillar of human development and concrete, large-scale programming not only can reduce the burden of undernutrition and deprivation in countries but also can advance the progress of nations.

The World Today and in 2030 || Celebrating the 30th anniversary of #WorldAIDSDay – a pioneering global health campaign first initiated by @WHO in 1988. Thanks to @UN @antonioguterres @UNECOSOC #GlobalGoals #HealthForAll

Urge policy-makers to promote a “health for all” agenda for HIV and related health services, such as tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis and noncommunicable diseases.

Event : World AIDS Day

When : 01 December 2018

Theme : Know Your Status

The world pledged to end AIDS by 2030. While we have seen remarkable progress in the past decade among children aged 0-9 years, adolescents have been left behind in HIV prevention efforts. A staggering 360,000 adolescents are projected to die of AIDS-related diseases between 2018 and 2030 without additional investment in HIV prevention, testing and treatment programs.

On World AIDS Day 2018, UNICEF is releasing global and regional snapshots of the world today and a new analysis of the situation for children and adolescents projected to 2030.

The world today: Global and regional snapshots

Click to access snapshots: Global, Eastern and Southern Africa, West and Central Africa, South Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, East Asia and the Pacific, Middle East and North Africa, Eastern Europe and Central Asia

  • 3.0 million children and adolescents are living with HIV
  • 430,000 children and adolescents became newly infected with the virus in 2017
  • 130,000 children and adolescents died from AIDS-related causes in 2017

The world in 2030

  • 1.9 million children and adolescents are projected to be living with HIV
  • 270,000 children and adolescents are projected to become newly infected with the virus annually
  • 56,000 children and adolescents are projected to die from AIDS-related causes annually
  • 2.0 million new HIV infections could be averted between 2018 and 2030 if global goals are met – 1.5 million of these would be averted among adolescents.