A multifaith movement will push to address climate change || @UN #SDGs #GlobalGoals

The Rev. Grace Ji-Sun Kim:


Climate change is happening right before our eyes. While we live in partial ignorance of the constant changes in the world around us, it is impossible to ignore the devastation that has emerged from the rising global climate. Scientists have been warning us for years that we must change our ways. Theynow warn us that we have only 12 years for global warming to be kept to 1.5 degrees Celsius or the risk of drought, floods and storms will worsen for millions.

My 2019 prediction is that churches and people of faith across the world will recognize the destruction of climate change and make a prophetic call to change our ways of living. This new year, the climate change problems that we have faced in 2018 will certainly worsen if we do not make conscious efforts to change our behavior and take action. Churches and religious organizations will recognize the urgency involved in changing our ways to fight climate change.

Religious groups like the World Council of Churches (WCC) and ACT Alliance are already engaged in advocacy work to fight for climate justice and sustainability. WCC works toward justice, peace and love and continues to respond to the impacts of climate change. Such groups need to work together with faith traditions around the world for interfaith advocacy and work.

Climate change is an issue of both ecological and economic justice. It disproportionally affects the world’s poorest people and displaces the most vulnerable communities. Thus religious people all over the world must unify their collective influence to fight this battle and work together to advocate for policies at local and national levels for sustainable practices.

As people of faith, we cannot continue to ignore climate change while God’s creation is suffering. We must act and invest in fighting climate change as it may be the only investment that will have direct results for a brighter and safer future. We need to invest in clean, renewable energy; reduce the global carbon footprint; reduce waste; and recycle and reuse more actively. As people of faith, we need to take seriously our theological engagement, advocacy and social action to advert a climate catastrophe.

Kim is an associate professor of theology at Earlham School of Religion and co-author of “Intersectional Theology” and “Healing Our Broken Humanity.”

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We wish you and your family a joyful, serene and white Christmas || Have a jolly and blessed Christmas and a Happy New Year!

Merry Christmas Wishes

  • May the melody and spirit of the holidays fill your home with love and peace. We wish you all the best and happy New Year too!
  • In this loveliest and happiest of seasons, may you find many reasons to celebrate. Have a wonderful Christmas!
  • May your Christmas be decorated with cheer and filled with love. Have a wonderful holiday!
  • Let the spirit of Christmas warm your home with love, joy and peace. Have a blessed Christmas!
  • Count your blessings, sing your Christmas carols, open your gifts, and make a wish under the Christmas tree. May you have a Merry Christmas!

India has the largest number of malnourished children in the world ||40% of the Indian children are undernourished ||

Malnutrition refers to deficiencies, excesses or imbalances in a person’s intake of energy and/or nutrients.

The term malnutrition covers 2 broad groups of conditions. One is ‘undernutrition’—which includes stunting (low height for age), wasting (low weight for height), underweight (low weight for age) and micronutrient deficiencies or insufficiencies (a lack of important vitamins and minerals). The other is overweight, obesity and diet-related noncommunicable diseases (such as heart disease, stroke, diabetes and cancer).

Consequences of Malnutrition:

Malnutrition affects people in every country. Around 1.9 billion adults worldwide are overweight, while 462 million are underweight. An estimated 41 million children under the age of 5 years are overweight or obese, while some 159 million are stunted and 50 million are wasted.

Many families cannot afford or access enough nutritious foods like fresh fruit and vegetables, legumes, meat and milk, while foods and drinks high in fat, sugar and salt are cheaper and more readily available, leading to a rapid rise in the number of children and adults who are overweight and obese, in poor as well as rich countries.

Malnutrition in India:

“More than one third of the world’s malnourished children live in India. Among these, half of the children under three years old are underweight and a third of wealthiest children are over-nutriented.” said the joint study by Assocham and EY. The report found that towards the end of 2015, 40% (i.e. 50.8 million) of the Indian children were undernourished.

About 37% of under-five children are underweight, 39% are stunted, 21% are wasted and 8% are severely acutely malnourished.
Only about 10 per cent children under the age 6-23 months are receiving an adequate diet.

In the age bracket of 1-5 years, the prevalence of underweight children ranged from 42% in Jharkhand, followed by Bihar, MP and UP with 37%, 36% and 34.1% respectively, to 14.1% in Manipur. The prevalence of stunting ranged from 50.4% in UP to 19.4% in Kerala according to the report.

India is ranked as the third most obese nation of the world after US and China and is called the diabetes capital of the world, with about 69.2 million people living with it as per the 2015 data by WHO.

One of the major causes for malnutrition in India is economic inequality. Due to the low social status of some population groups, their diet often lacks in both quality and quantity.

It is important to understand that malnutrition derives not just from a lack of food but from a diverse set of interlinked processes linking health, care, education, sanitation and hygiene, access to resources, women’s empowerment and more.

Nutrition is a core pillar of human development and concrete, large-scale programming not only can reduce the burden of undernutrition and deprivation in countries but also can advance the progress of nations.

The World Today and in 2030 || Celebrating the 30th anniversary of #WorldAIDSDay – a pioneering global health campaign first initiated by @WHO in 1988. Thanks to @UN @antonioguterres @UNECOSOC #GlobalGoals #HealthForAll

Urge policy-makers to promote a “health for all” agenda for HIV and related health services, such as tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis and noncommunicable diseases.

Event : World AIDS Day

When : 01 December 2018

Theme : Know Your Status

The world pledged to end AIDS by 2030. While we have seen remarkable progress in the past decade among children aged 0-9 years, adolescents have been left behind in HIV prevention efforts. A staggering 360,000 adolescents are projected to die of AIDS-related diseases between 2018 and 2030 without additional investment in HIV prevention, testing and treatment programs.

On World AIDS Day 2018, UNICEF is releasing global and regional snapshots of the world today and a new analysis of the situation for children and adolescents projected to 2030.

The world today: Global and regional snapshots

Click to access snapshots: Global, Eastern and Southern Africa, West and Central Africa, South Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, East Asia and the Pacific, Middle East and North Africa, Eastern Europe and Central Asia

  • 3.0 million children and adolescents are living with HIV
  • 430,000 children and adolescents became newly infected with the virus in 2017
  • 130,000 children and adolescents died from AIDS-related causes in 2017

The world in 2030

  • 1.9 million children and adolescents are projected to be living with HIV
  • 270,000 children and adolescents are projected to become newly infected with the virus annually
  • 56,000 children and adolescents are projected to die from AIDS-related causes annually
  • 2.0 million new HIV infections could be averted between 2018 and 2030 if global goals are met – 1.5 million of these would be averted among adolescents.

Over 3,400 people die on the 🌎’s roads every day and tens of millions are injured or disabled every year. 👧🏽 Children, 🚶‍🚶🏻‍♀️pedestrians, 🚴‍♀️cyclists 👵and older people are among the most vulnerable of road users. #WDoR2018 @WHO @UNGeneva

Global status report on road safety 2015

The Global status report on road safety 2015, reflecting information from 180 countries, indicates that worldwide the total number of road traffic deaths has plateaued at 1.25 million per year, with the highest road traffic fatality rates in low-income countries. In the last three years, 17 countries have aligned at least one of their laws with best practice on seat-belts, drink–driving, speed, motorcycle helmets or child restraints. While there has been progress towards improving road safety legislation and in making vehicles safer, the report shows that the pace of change is too slow. Urgent action is needed to achieve the ambitious target for road safety reflected in the newly adopted 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: halving the global number of deaths and injuries from road traffic crashes by 2020. Made possible through funding from Bloomberg Philanthropies, this report is the third in the series, and provides a snapshot of the road safety situation globally, highlighting the gaps and the measures needed to best drive progress.

Christel DeHaan, the 76-year-old founder of @ChirstelHouse has a brilliant way to provide children with a holistic growth that’s a sure shot way to #EndPoverty cycle in a family. Thanks to @UN @ECOSOC @IIB @wfyi @AgriNovusIN @GerryDick @JeremyIndy1

It isn’t uncommon for entrepreneurs to be philanthropists. They run some of the world’s largest charitable organisations. But it isn’t often that you find someone who sells their multi-million dollar business and sets up a nonprofit that works to eradicate poverty with the money.

But it isn’t often that you find someone who sells their multi-million dollar business and sets up a nonprofit that works to eradicate poverty with the money.

That’s the story of Christel DeHaan, the 76-year-old founder of Christel House. Over the past two decades, she built an exemplary school for underprivileged children across the world.
Christel was born in Germany right at the end of World War II. Growing up in war-torn Germany, she was all too familiar with poverty. She left to the UK when she was 16 to work as a nanny. Shortly after, she moved to Indianapolis, USA, where she found a place to call home.

The trip that changed her life

In 1973, Christel and her husband set up Resort Condominiums International. The venture went on to become the world’s largest vacation exchange provider. In 1996, she sold the company for a whopping $360 million.
Two years later, on a trip to Mexico, Christel’s life took a sharp turn. While visiting some of their orphanages, she saw that childrenwere warehoused in crowded dormitories. There was no electricity in most orphanages. The residents had to gather water from a cistern. Kids had to walk long distances to school each day because the school buses were broken.
Being no stranger to destitute conditions herself, Christel knew that a fat cheque would not solve the problem of poverty. These children and communities needed more than money. They needed a system of change. They needed an organisation that educated and empowered them. So she set out with a new mission–to build that organisation.
With her sharp mind and business acumen, it wasn’t hard for her to see the root of the problem. Her long-term plan was an institute that gave education, nutrition, health checkups, and general awareness to poor communities. This was how she established Christel House.

An organisation that changed thousands of lives

Christel DeHaan at Christel House in Bangalore.
Source: Huffpost India
Christel House was first set up in Indiana, USA and went on to have centres in Mexico, India and South Africa. Setting up centresinternationally could have been tricky, but Christel leveraged her knowledge from running RCI to gain pace.
She aimed for regions that had high levels of poverty, easy-to-work-with tax and legal structures, and available resources. This was her way of giving back to countries that served her well during her days running RCI.
She would build a system that fought poverty with education. But education alone was not enough. The mission was to provide children with a holistic growth for at least 20 years. ‘The multiplier effect’, as she calls it, was a sure shot way to break the cycle of poverty in a family.
Christel House educates kids till high school. During this time, they give their students two nutritious meals a day, regular health checkups, and needed medical care.
Upon graduation, they provide counselling and financial help for college and job placements. They instil values of compassion and service within their children and many of them go on to serve the community as they grow older.

A way forward from poverty

Christel House provides education and holistic growth for poor kids across the world.
Source: christelhouse.org
Christel thinks of the organisation as a joint venture between her and those who donate to help them. She covers all the administrative costs of the international organisation, which has been an average of $5.7 million each year. She ensures that whatever the donors give, goes directly towards helping the children.
Until the age of 75, she worked long hours, including weekends.She visited all the Christel House locations every year, which spanned across four continents. There was a lot to be done and she was always on top of it.
In October 2018, she decided to step down as the CEO of Christel House. She continues to serve on the board while the CEO is now Bard Peterson, former mayor of Indianapolis. Christel trusts that she’s left her legacy in the right hands, under the care of someone who understands her vision of excellence for all.


About @saverango

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Did you know what is in your burger? More than you think!

Americans eat around three burgers a week ||

You walk into a burger restaurant. What’s going through your mind? Double meat with extra bacon and cheese? Brown bun or added slice of avocado? Environmental degradation or ecological preservation?

You probably don’t think about the latter. But maybe you should.

Research shows that if cows were a nation, they would be the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emitter. As humans, meat production is one of the most destructive ways in which we leave our footprint on the planet.

Hectares of rainforest in South America are cleared for cattle, to make our favorite classic burgers and steaks. One average quarter pounder beef burger drains around 1,695 liters of water, depending on where it is made, from precious resources.

Yet our demand for meat is going up. The Food and Agriculture Organization projects an increase of 76 per cent in global meat consumption by 2050. More meat will be eaten than ever before in our history.

And we will pay the environmental and human price—unless we make a change now.

What are the alternatives?

We need to eat less or sustainably reared meat in parts of the world where meat consumption per person is high. Even replacing red meat with chicken can be more environmentally friendly.

Manufacturers of vegan and plant-based meat alternatives point out that their products typically contain less fat and cholesterol than their processed beef equivalent. There is a small but growing trend for meat-free “meat”.

UN Environment’s Champions of the Earth winners Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat have done research to strip the basic building blocks of meat down to protein, fat, water and trace minerals, recreating meat entirely from plants—at a fraction of the cost to the environment.

Research by Beyond Meat and the University of Michigan Study found that the amount of water in your average swimming pool can produce 312 beef burgers or 60,837 Beyond Burgers.

The research also shows that Americans eat around three burgers a week. If one of these was swapped for a Beyond Meat plant-based alternative burger for one year, it would be like taking the greenhouse gases from 12 million cars off the road for a year.

Both companies say their burgers require between 75 – 99 per cent less water; 93 – 95 per cent less land; and generate 87 – 90 per cent fewer emissions than regular beef burgers, consuming nearly half the energy to make.

These calculations factor in primary raw materials like ingredients, including coconut oil, citrus extract, potato starch and water, and transport, lighting and cold store distribution.

It’s time to weigh up the real cost of that burger.