Best wishes of #Dessehra to all of you! from #saverians

May this #Dessehra bring peace, joy and prosperity in your life!

It’s time to celebrate the victory of the good over the evil. Let’s continue with the same spirit.

Happy #Dusshera2018

Background:

Dussehra or Vijaya Dashmi is celebrated at the end of Navratri, a day after Maha Navami. In the northern and western states of India, the festival is celebrated as Dussehra, marking the end of “Ramlila” and Lord Rama’s victory over Ravana. In the southern, eastern and northeastern states,Vijayadashami marks the end of Durga Puja, remembering goddess Durga’s victory over the buffalo demon Mahishasura to help restore dharma. During Vijayadashami celebrations, the idols of Goddess Durga is immersed into the water. A procession is carried out amid chants and music. For Dussehra celebrations, the towering effigies of Ravana symbolizing the evil are burnt with fireworks marking the evil’s destruction. Dussehra in a way also marks the onset of preparations for the festival of lights – Diwali, which falls twenty days after the festival.

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#EndPoverty Campaign run by @saverango on the occasion of International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

Today! While observing International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, saverango organized a “Slogan Writing Competition” at a Modern Madarsa, Hapur, aiming to aware the community people about International Day.

Fifty Students participated in the program, students wrote the slogans in four languages (Hindi, English, Urdu and Arabic) and Prizes were distributed to the winners by the organization @saverango to motivate the children.

Poverty is a violation of human rights and we all need to come together to ensure that these rights are respected. Join us on 17 October for the Commemoration of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. #EndPoverty #EndHunger #StandUp4HumanRights

Theme — Coming together with those furthest behind to build an inclusive world of universal respect for human rights and dignity.

International Day for the Eradication of Poverty is observed on October 17 each year since 1993. It promotes people’s awareness of the need to eradicate poverty and destitution worldwide, particularly in developing countries.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the declaration by the General Assembly, in its resolution 47/196 of 22 December 1992, of 17 October as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. This year also marks the 30th anniversary of the Call to Action by Father Joseph Wresinski — which inspired the observance of October 17 as the World Day for Overcoming Extreme Poverty — and the recognition by the United Nations of the day as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere – United Nations Sustainable Development.

Click here to read more!

Background :

Joseph Wresinski was one of the first persons to highlight this direct link between human rights and extreme poverty. In February 1987, he appealed to the Human Rights Commission to examine the question of extreme poverty and human rights and eloquently captured the nexus between human rights and extreme poverty with his profound observation:

“Wherever men and women are condemned to live in extreme poverty, human rights are violated. To come together to ensure that these rights be respected is our solemn duty.”

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It is important to recall the fundamental connection between extreme poverty and human rights, and that people living in poverty are disproportionately affected by many human rights violations.

Book Your Free Tickets!

Join us on 17 October for the Commemoration of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. #EndPoverty #EndHunger #StandUp4HumanRights

Theme — Coming together with those furthest behind to build an inclusive world of universal respect for human rights and dignity.

International Day for the Eradication of Poverty is observed on October 17 each year since 1993. It promotes people’s awareness of the need to eradicate poverty and destitution worldwide, particularly in developing countries.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the declaration by the General Assembly, in its resolution 47/196 of 22 December 1992, of 17 October as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. This year also marks the 30th anniversary of the Call to Action by Father Joseph Wresinski — which inspired the observance of October 17 as the World Day for Overcoming Extreme Poverty — and the recognition by the United Nations of the day as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere – United Nations Sustainable Development.

While global poverty rates have been cut by more than half since 2000, one in ten people in developing regions are still living with their families on less than the international poverty line of US$1.90 a day, and there are millions more who make little more than this daily amount. Significant progress has been made in many countries within Eastern and Southeastern Asia, but up to 42% of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa continues to live below the poverty line.

Poverty is more than the lack of income and resources to ensure a sustainable livelihood. Its manifestations include hunger and malnutrition, limited access to education and other basic services, social discrimination and exclusion as well as the lack of participation in decision-making.

Economic growth must be inclusive to provide sustainable jobs and promote equality. Social protection systems need to be implemented to help alleviate the suffering of disaster-prone countries and provide support in the face of great economic risks. These systems will help strengthen responses by afflicted populations to unexpected economic losses during disasters and will eventually help to end extreme poverty in the most impoverished areas.

Facts and Figures:

783 million people live below the international poverty line of US$1.90 a day;

In 2016, almost 10 per cent of the world’s workers live with their families on less than US$1.90 per person per day;

Globally, there are 122 women aged 25 to 34 living in extreme poverty for every 100 men of the same age group;

Most people living below the poverty line belong to two regions: Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa;

High poverty rates are often found in small, fragile and conflict-affected countries ;
One in four children under age five in the world has inadequate height for his or her age ;
As of 2016, only 45% of the world’s population were effectively covered by at least one social protection cash benefit ;
In 2017, economic losses due to disasters, including three major hurricanes in the USA and the Caribbean, were estimated at over $300 billion.

Source :- https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/poverty/

Background :

Joseph Wresinski was one of the first persons to highlight this direct link between human rights and extreme poverty. In February 1987, he appealed to the Human Rights Commission to examine the question of extreme poverty and human rights and eloquently captured the nexus between human rights and extreme poverty with his profound observation:

“Wherever men and women are condemned to live in extreme poverty, human rights are violated. To come together to ensure that these rights be respected is our solemn duty.”

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It is important to recall the fundamental connection between extreme poverty and human rights, and that people living in poverty are disproportionately affected by many human rights violations.

Book Your Free Tickets!

@NobelPrize in Physics awarded to three people including first woman to win #nobelprize in 55 years

The 2018 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to three people, including the first woman to win the Prize in 55 years. The recipients are Arthur Ashkin (half share), Gérard Moureau (quarter share) and Donna Strickland (quarter share), and the Prize committee cited the three this way:

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2018 was awarded “for groundbreaking inventions in the field of laser physics” with one half to Arthur Ashkin “for the optical tweezers and their application to biological systems”, the other half jointly to Gérard Mourou and Donna Strickland “for their method of generating high-intensity, ultra-short optical pulses” .”

Ashkin, at 96, is the oldest of all Nobel Laureates in history; he’s now retired but worked at Bell Labs and Lucent Technology.

Donna Strickland and Frances Arnold receive #nobelprize @NobelPrize @UN

Donna Strickland, the first woman in more than 50 years to win the Nobel Prize for physics, and Frances Arnold, the fifth woman to receive the award in Chemistry. Having role models is critical for the next generation of female scientists.

Nobel Peace Prize 2018 to Denis and Nadia

The Nobel Peace Prize 2018 was awarded jointly to Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad “for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict.”

Announcement :
The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided to award the Nobel Peace Prize for 2018 to Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad for their efforts to end the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict. Both laureates have made a crucial contribution to focusing attention on, and combating, such war crimes. Denis Mukwege is the helper who has devoted his life to defending these victims. Nadia Murad is the witness who tells of the abuses perpetrated against herself and others. Each of them in their own way has helped to give greater visibility to war-time sexual violence, so that the perpetrators can be held accountable for their actions.

The physician Denis Mukwege has spent large parts of his adult life helping the victims of sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Since the Panzi Hospital was established in Bukavu in 2008, Dr. Mukwege and his staff have treated thousands of patients who have fallen victim to such assaults. Most of the abuses have been committed in the context of a long-lasting civil war that has cost the lives of more than six million Congolese.

Denis Mukwege is the foremost, most unifying symbol, both nationally and internationally, of the struggle to end sexual violence in war and armed conflicts. His basic principle is that “justice is everyone’s business”. Men and women, officers and soldiers, and local, national and international authorities alike all have a shared responsibility for reporting, and combating, this type of war crime. The importance of Dr. Mukwege’s enduring, dedicated and selfless efforts in this field cannot be overstated. He has repeatedly condemned impunity for mass rape and criticised the Congolese government and other countries for not doing enough to stop the use of sexual violence against women as a strategy and weapon of war.

Nadia Murad is herself a victim of war crimes. She refused to accept the social codes that require women to remain silent and ashamed of the abuses to which they have been subjected. She has shown uncommon courage in recounting her own sufferings and speaking up on behalf of other victims.

Nadia Murad is a member of the Yazidi minority in northern Iraq, where she lived with her family in the remote village of Kocho. In August 2014 the Islamic State (IS) launched a brutal, systematic attack on the villages of the Sinjar district, aimed at exterminating the Yazidi population. In Nadia Murad’s village, several hundred people were massacred. The younger women, including underage children, were abducted and held as sex slaves. While a captive of the IS, Nadia Murad was repeatedly subjected to rape and other abuses. Her assaulters threatened to execute her if she did not convert to their hateful, inhuman version of Islam.

Nadia Murad is just one of an estimated 3 000 Yazidi girls and women who were victims of rape and other abuses by the IS army. The abuses were systematic, and part of a military strategy. Thus they served as a weapon in the fight against Yazidis and other religious minorities.

After a three-month nightmare Nadia Murad managed to flee. Following her escape, she chose to speak openly about what she had suffered. In 2016, at the age of just 23, she was named the UN’s first Goodwill Ambassador for the Dignity of Survivors of Human Trafficking.

This year marks a decade since the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1820 (2008), which determined that the use of sexual violence as a weapon of war and armed conflict constitutes both a war crime and a threat to international peace and security. This is also set out in the Rome Statute of 1998, which governs the work of the International Criminal Court. The Statute establishes that sexual violence in war and armed conflict is a grave violation of international law. A more peaceful world can only be achieved if women and their fundamental rights and security are recognised and protected in war.

This year’s Nobel Peace Prize is firmly embedded in the criteria spelled out in Alfred Nobel’s will. Denis Mukwege and Nadia Murad have both put their personal security at risk by courageously combating war crimes and seeking justice for the victims. They have thereby promoted the fraternity of nations through the application of principles of international law.

Oslo, 5 October 2018

https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/peace/2018/press-release/

#NobelPrize #NobelPeacePrize #saverians #social