World needs Science and Science needs Women || Join @UN_Women today #WomenInScience Day || Thanks to @UN @antonioguterres @UNECOSOC

On 11 February, the United Nations, partners worldwide, women and girls will mark the International Day of Women and Girls in Science. Why does it matter?

Recent studies suggest that 65 per cent of children entering primary school today will have jobs that do not yet exist. While more girls are attending school than before, girls are significantly under-represented in STEM subjects in many settings and they appear to lose interest in STEM subjects as they reach adolescence. Debunking the myths that girls do not like the sciences and other and gender stereotypes, along with investment in teacher trainings, gender-responsive technology and innovation can reverse these trends.

With Sustainable Development Goal 9, part of the Global Goals that world leaders agreed to in 2015 with a deadline of 2030, countries around the world have pledged to “build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation”. Yet, a look at where funding is allocated a different picture. At present, only 1.7 per cent of the global GDP is dedicated for research and experimental development.

On International Day of Women and Girls in Science, lets change this narrative. Join us in celebrating women and girls who are leading innovation and call for actions to remove all barriers that hold them back.

Read more Click here!

The World Today and in 2030 || Celebrating the 30th anniversary of #WorldAIDSDay – a pioneering global health campaign first initiated by @WHO in 1988. Thanks to @UN @antonioguterres @UNECOSOC #GlobalGoals #HealthForAll

Urge policy-makers to promote a “health for all” agenda for HIV and related health services, such as tuberculosis (TB), hepatitis and noncommunicable diseases.

Event : World AIDS Day

When : 01 December 2018

Theme : Know Your Status

The world pledged to end AIDS by 2030. While we have seen remarkable progress in the past decade among children aged 0-9 years, adolescents have been left behind in HIV prevention efforts. A staggering 360,000 adolescents are projected to die of AIDS-related diseases between 2018 and 2030 without additional investment in HIV prevention, testing and treatment programs.

On World AIDS Day 2018, UNICEF is releasing global and regional snapshots of the world today and a new analysis of the situation for children and adolescents projected to 2030.

The world today: Global and regional snapshots

Click to access snapshots: Global, Eastern and Southern Africa, West and Central Africa, South Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, East Asia and the Pacific, Middle East and North Africa, Eastern Europe and Central Asia

  • 3.0 million children and adolescents are living with HIV
  • 430,000 children and adolescents became newly infected with the virus in 2017
  • 130,000 children and adolescents died from AIDS-related causes in 2017

The world in 2030

  • 1.9 million children and adolescents are projected to be living with HIV
  • 270,000 children and adolescents are projected to become newly infected with the virus annually
  • 56,000 children and adolescents are projected to die from AIDS-related causes annually
  • 2.0 million new HIV infections could be averted between 2018 and 2030 if global goals are met – 1.5 million of these would be averted among adolescents.

70th Anniversary of Universal Declaration of Human Rights |💁10 Dec 2018| Dignity of millions has been uplifted, untold humansuffering prevented and foundations 4 a most just world have been laid. #StandUp4HumanRights Thanx @UN @antonioguterres @UNGeneva @UNECOSOC

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights empowers us all.

#StandUp4HumanRights

The power of the Universal Declaration is the power of ideas to change the world. It inspires us to continue working to ensure all people can gain freedom, equality and dignity.

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) is a milestone document in the history of human rights. Drafted by representatives with different legal and cultural backgrounds from all regions of the world, the Declaration was proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in Paris on 10 December 1948 (General Assembly resolution 217 A) as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected and it has been translated into over 500 languages.

Article 1

Free and equal

All human beings are born free and equal and should be treated the same way.

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Article 2

Freedom from discrimination

Everyone can claim their rights regardless of sex, race, language, religion, social standing, etc.

Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, colour, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status. Furthermore, no distinction shall be made on the basis of the political, jurisdictional or international status of the country or territory to which a person belongs, whether it be independent, trust, non-self-governing or under any other limitation of sovereignty.

Article 3

Right to life

Everyone has the right to life and to live in freedom and safety.

Everyone has the right to life, liberty and security of person.

Article 4

Freedom from slavery

No one has the right to treat you as a slave nor should you enslave anyone.

No one shall be held in slavery or servitude; slavery and the slave trade shall be prohibited in all their forms.

Article 5

Freedom from torture

No one has the right to torture you.

No one shall be subjected to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment.

Article 6

Right to recognition before the law

You should be legally protected in the same way everywhere like anyone else.

Everyone has the right to recognition everywhere as a person before the law.

Article 7

Right to equality before the law

The law is the same for everyone and should be applied in the same manner to all.

All are equal before the law and are entitled without any discrimination to equal protection of the law. All are entitled to equal protection against any discrimination in violation of this Declaration and against any incitement to such discrimination.

Article 8

Access to justice

You have the right to obtain legal help and access the justice system when your rights are not respected.

Everyone has the right to an effective remedy by the competent national tribunals for acts violating the fundamental rights granted him by the constitution or by law.

Article 9

Freedom from arbitrary detention

No one can arrest or detain you arbitrarily , or send you away from your country unjustly.

No one shall be subjected to arbitrary arrest, detention or exile.

Article 10

Right to a fair trial

Trials should be public and tried in a fair manner by an impartial and independent tribunal.

Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him.

To read Article 11 to 30 please click here

Thanks for reading this post!

United Nations Day, 24 October #UNDay2018 #Saverians

UN Day marks the anniversary of the entry into force in 1945 of the UN Charter. With the ratification of this founding document by the majority of its signatories, including the five permanent members of the Security Council, the United Nations officially came into being.

24 October has been celebrated as United Nations Day since 1948. In 1971, the United Nations General Assembly recommended that the day be observed by Member States as a public holiday.

Did you know?
Most of the world’s people live no more than 200 miles from the sea;
Decolonization changed the face of the planet, creating more than 80 nations;
Women in the labour market still earn on average a quarter less than men globally.

#UNDay2018

#EndPoverty Campaign run by @saverango on the occasion of International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

Today! While observing International Day for the Eradication of Poverty, saverango organized a “Slogan Writing Competition” at a Modern Madarsa, Hapur, aiming to aware the community people about International Day.

Fifty Students participated in the program, students wrote the slogans in four languages (Hindi, English, Urdu and Arabic) and Prizes were distributed to the winners by the organization @saverango to motivate the children.

Poverty is a violation of human rights and we all need to come together to ensure that these rights are respected. Join us on 17 October for the Commemoration of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. #EndPoverty #EndHunger #StandUp4HumanRights

Theme — Coming together with those furthest behind to build an inclusive world of universal respect for human rights and dignity.

International Day for the Eradication of Poverty is observed on October 17 each year since 1993. It promotes people’s awareness of the need to eradicate poverty and destitution worldwide, particularly in developing countries.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the declaration by the General Assembly, in its resolution 47/196 of 22 December 1992, of 17 October as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. This year also marks the 30th anniversary of the Call to Action by Father Joseph Wresinski — which inspired the observance of October 17 as the World Day for Overcoming Extreme Poverty — and the recognition by the United Nations of the day as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere – United Nations Sustainable Development.

Click here to read more!

Background :

Joseph Wresinski was one of the first persons to highlight this direct link between human rights and extreme poverty. In February 1987, he appealed to the Human Rights Commission to examine the question of extreme poverty and human rights and eloquently captured the nexus between human rights and extreme poverty with his profound observation:

“Wherever men and women are condemned to live in extreme poverty, human rights are violated. To come together to ensure that these rights be respected is our solemn duty.”

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It is important to recall the fundamental connection between extreme poverty and human rights, and that people living in poverty are disproportionately affected by many human rights violations.

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Join us on 17 October for the Commemoration of the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. #EndPoverty #EndHunger #StandUp4HumanRights

Theme — Coming together with those furthest behind to build an inclusive world of universal respect for human rights and dignity.

International Day for the Eradication of Poverty is observed on October 17 each year since 1993. It promotes people’s awareness of the need to eradicate poverty and destitution worldwide, particularly in developing countries.

This year marks the 25th anniversary of the declaration by the General Assembly, in its resolution 47/196 of 22 December 1992, of 17 October as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty. This year also marks the 30th anniversary of the Call to Action by Father Joseph Wresinski — which inspired the observance of October 17 as the World Day for Overcoming Extreme Poverty — and the recognition by the United Nations of the day as the International Day for the Eradication of Poverty.

Goal 1: End poverty in all its forms everywhere – United Nations Sustainable Development.

While global poverty rates have been cut by more than half since 2000, one in ten people in developing regions are still living with their families on less than the international poverty line of US$1.90 a day, and there are millions more who make little more than this daily amount. Significant progress has been made in many countries within Eastern and Southeastern Asia, but up to 42% of the population in Sub-Saharan Africa continues to live below the poverty line.

Poverty is more than the lack of income and resources to ensure a sustainable livelihood. Its manifestations include hunger and malnutrition, limited access to education and other basic services, social discrimination and exclusion as well as the lack of participation in decision-making.

Economic growth must be inclusive to provide sustainable jobs and promote equality. Social protection systems need to be implemented to help alleviate the suffering of disaster-prone countries and provide support in the face of great economic risks. These systems will help strengthen responses by afflicted populations to unexpected economic losses during disasters and will eventually help to end extreme poverty in the most impoverished areas.

Facts and Figures:

783 million people live below the international poverty line of US$1.90 a day;

In 2016, almost 10 per cent of the world’s workers live with their families on less than US$1.90 per person per day;

Globally, there are 122 women aged 25 to 34 living in extreme poverty for every 100 men of the same age group;

Most people living below the poverty line belong to two regions: Southern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa;

High poverty rates are often found in small, fragile and conflict-affected countries ;
One in four children under age five in the world has inadequate height for his or her age ;
As of 2016, only 45% of the world’s population were effectively covered by at least one social protection cash benefit ;
In 2017, economic losses due to disasters, including three major hurricanes in the USA and the Caribbean, were estimated at over $300 billion.

Source :- https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/poverty/

Background :

Joseph Wresinski was one of the first persons to highlight this direct link between human rights and extreme poverty. In February 1987, he appealed to the Human Rights Commission to examine the question of extreme poverty and human rights and eloquently captured the nexus between human rights and extreme poverty with his profound observation:

“Wherever men and women are condemned to live in extreme poverty, human rights are violated. To come together to ensure that these rights be respected is our solemn duty.”

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the proclamation of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. It is important to recall the fundamental connection between extreme poverty and human rights, and that people living in poverty are disproportionately affected by many human rights violations.

Book Your Free Tickets!

International Day of Non-Violence 2 October

The International Day of Non-Violence is marked on 2 October, the birthday of Mahatma Gandhi, leader of the Indian independence movement and pioneer of the philosophy and strategy of non-violence.

According to General Assembly resolution A/RES/61/271 of 15 June 2007, which established the commemoration, the International Day is an occasion to “disseminate the message of non-violence, including through education and public awareness”. The resolution reaffirms “the universal relevance of the principle of non-violence” and the desire “to secure a culture of peace, tolerance, understanding and non-violence”.

Introducing the resolution in the General Assembly on behalf of 140 co-sponsors, India’s Minister of State for External Affairs, Mr. Anand Sharma, said that the wide and diverse sponsorship of the resolution was a reflection of the universal respect for Mahatma Gandhi and of the enduring relevance of his philosophy. Quoting the late leader’s own words, he said: “Non-violence is the greatest force at the disposal of mankind. It is mightier than the mightiest weapon of destruction devised by the ingenuity of man”.

http://www.un.org/en/events/nonviolenceday/

Savera Literacy Award Presented to 2 Educationists.

While observing International Literacy Day, Savera NGO presented “Savera Literacy Award ” 2018 to Dr. Nafees Ahmad Chaudhry, Retd. Principal, Kisan Degree College, Simbhaoli and to Shri Upkar Dutt Sharma, Principal at Adarsh Inter College, Nali Husaunpur, Hapur in recognition of thier astounding ability to educate the youth from rural areas and their commitment of girl child education & women literacy.

Congratulations to both of them.

The Conference on Literacy and Skills Development

Event : International Literacy Day

Topic : Literacy and Skills Development

Award : Savera Literacy Award

When,
Saturday, 8 September 2018 at 10:30 AM.
Where: Hapur, Uttar Pradesh

Details :

Since 1967, International Literacy Day celebrations have taken place annually around the world to remind the public of the importance of literacy as a matter of dignity and human rights, and to advance the literacy agenda towards a more literate and sustainable society. “The Conference on Literacy and Skills Development” will explore ways to make effective connections between literacy and technical and vocational skills in policies, practice, systems and governance.

Focusing on youth and adults within the lifelong learning framework, the effective linkages between literacy and skills will be explored.

The renewed focus on integrated approaches is grounded, on the one hand, in persistent literacy and skills challenges, and, on the other, in the new skills demands and impetus generated by the
current context of globalization, digitization and the Global Education 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goal 4. Literacy is a fundamental human right and the foundation for lifelong learning. It is fully essential to social and human development in its ability to transform lives.

Did you know?
758 million adults (15 years and older) are still illetrate in the world. Almost world’s half illetrate population live in India. According to UNESCO institute for Statistics 2015 India’s literacy rate is 72.1 % below average world literacy rate 86.3%.
Uttar Pradesh is the largest population state of India with 200 million people and literary rate 67.68% below national literacy rate 74.04 as of 2011 census. However Literacy Rates Continue to Rise from One Generation to the Next.

Award Ceremony : Savera Literacy Award will be presented to selected persons showing excellent work for Literacy.

Education transforms lives and is at the heart of SAVERA’s mission to build peace, eradicate poverty and drive sustainable development.

Book your free tickets!